Category Archives: cremation

cremation service in Washington Crossing, PA

Leave a Legacy After Your Cremation Service

How will you create a legacy you can be proud of after your death and cremation service in Washington Crossing, PA?

Leaving a legacy can mean two things. First, a legacy can be money or property left to someone in a will. Second, a legacy can also mean the outlook, values, or training that you pass on to other people in your family and beyond. Leaving a legacy might seem overwhelming, but it’s really as simple as living the way you want to be remembered.

No matter which type of legacy you’re referring to, it can be said that a legacy is always creating something valuable in your life that can be passed on to other after your death. You can leave one, either, or both kinds of legacies to help people remember and honor you after you’re gone. Here are some specific tips for crafting and leaving your legacy.

To begin, think about what you want written on your tombstone. Consider how you want to be remembered, and then live that way. You can also be your best before you work on others and share memories. It will be pretty hard to pass on some idealistic torch if you don’t live that way yourself. Think about what matters most to you. Where do you spend your time and money? Those are the things you treasure most, and are most likely going to be what you’re remembered for. For example, if you spend most of your time at work, you’ll be remembered as a hard worker. write a legacy statement. Consider what others want. You might think that spending all your time at work to provide for your family might be what they want, but it also might not be.

Perhaps your children or family would rather have more quality time with you than new toys or a fancy car. Take time to understand what would really make others happy and encourage them. If you don’t know, just ask! You can write down what you want your legacy to be to help guide your actions. Consider what you’ll be remembered for, what characteristics or skills you want to pass down, what traditions you want your family to continue, and a main belief or worldview you’d like to pass on. Then, plan for how you’ll accomplish what you wrote in your statement.

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Why not give your time to the people you care about? Work, hobbies, and social events can make us busy, maybe even too busy to spend time with those you care about most. Show your loved ones that they’re priorities for you by making them priorities in your schedule.

Work on living your beliefs and ideals. That way, others will be inspired by the example you set and might then choose to live that way as well. The stories you tell reflect your values and make others smile. Tell stories from your life, your family’s lives, and others you remember to make happy memories, reflect your values, and put smiles on people’s faces.

Simply call or visit us today for more information if you want more legacy tips or information on Washington Crossing, PA cremation services.

cremation services in Newtown, PA

Death Positive Cremation Services

When you think about funerals or cremations, you most likely picture somber, dark rooms full of grief, formality, macabre moments, and feelings of loss. Like most, you probably associate death with negative feelings and thoughts. The death positive movement, however, seeks to accept death as a natural part of life without treating it as taboo. Keep reading to find out more about cremation services in Newtown, PA and death positivity.

The death positive movement is thought to have first been derived from the work of anthropologist Ernest Becker in his 1973 book “The Denial of Death.” The term “death positive” was later created by coined by author and mortician Caitlin Doughty, who was heavily influenced by Becker. The movement centers around the concept that, as death a natural part of life, we need to be comfortable with talking about, planning for, and generally accepting death.

The movement’s leaders give examples including having honest discussions with loved ones and family about the process of dying, what happens to bodies after death, death rituals and traditions, options for burial, funerals, body disposition, and ceremonies to honor a person’s legacy. No matter how or what you do as part of the death positive movement, its main idea is that if we talk about and approach death from an open and honest place, we won’t be so afraid and anxious about it.

Here are more of the movement’s integral ideas and beliefs to help you decide if its right for you. Modern generations are very uncomfortable with death and dead bodies. However, the positive death movement believes that personally taking care of a loved one’s body after death results in open and healthy grief. They also believe green or natural burial options should be available for all. Natural burials are when the body or cremated remains are buried without embalming or a shroud and in a simple pine casket or cremation urn.

This does necessitate a quick process after a death, but it is most similar to how our ancestors lost and grieved. Family-centered funerals should be the norm. Instead of written in a will or discussed after a death with a funeral director, end-of-life wishes should be openly and honestly discussed with the family. This encourages positivity and normalcy around death and also helps ensure the deceased’s final wishes are carried out. The idea that hands-on participation in the service, body preparation, and burial or cremation can be healing is another core death positivity belief.

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The death positivity movement also believes in the incorporation of meaningful rituals and ceremony into the activities surrounding a death. Science has shown rituals such as eulogies, readings, songs or singing, donating a body to science, or even the simple act of burial or cremains scattering offer closure, aid in grief, and lead to healthier mourning.

Call or visit us today for more information as we are happy to help if you want to learn more about the death positivity movement or have questions about Newtown, PA cremation services.

Langhorne, PA cremation services

Cremation Service Trends in Langhorne, PA

In 2022 more than ever, a new year will certainly bring new trends in Langhorne, PA cremation services, funeral homes, memorials, and more. But how will the changes and challenges of the past year affect the funeral and cremation industry?

Here is a list of funeral home trends for this year to inspire your planning and preplanning as well as provide interesting insights. To begin, there will be a lot of virtual services and personalized services. Virtual funerals, wakes, and memorials became popular in 2020 because of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, we predict they will remain popular well into 2022 as virtual services offer many benefits from ease of scheduling to allowing out-of-town family members and loved ones to easily attend. As consumers, we’re becoming more aware of the affect we have on the environment. This has led to an uptick in sustainable or environmentally friendly funeral and cremation services like green burials, eco-friendly cremation caskets and runs, and a general increase in sensitivity surrounding sustainability and renewal after death.

Funerals have slowly been moving away from tradition and becoming more and more personalized to the deceased and their loved ones. Unique, creative personalization of the funeral service has become the new norm. This means you’re free to choose the services, products, and traditions you want for the deceased’s funeral or memorial, whether that means hosting a celebration of life or putting them to rest in a cremation urn that will turn into a tree. Direct cremation and at-home funerals will be popular, too. Direct cremation is when the body is cremated directly after death without any embalming, wake, or other services. Direct cremation is the most affordable body disposition method, which is perhaps why its gaining popularity.

Beyond savings, it also allows the family to hold a memorial, scattering, or any other kind of service whenever they want as opposed to right after the death. What about memorial gardens or preplanning? A memorial garden is a community garden dedicated to the deceased. Oftentimes the dedication is made official through donations and made known through a plaque or a memorial bench. These gardens are becoming more and more popular as ways to remember the deceased and honor them for generations to come. Preplanning or advance planning funeral arrangements is a great trend as preplanning offers many benefits including savings, reduced stress, more control over your own funeral, and the ability to plan a more personalized service.

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DIY is moving from home improvement to funerals and memorials. An at-home funeral is when the memorial or funeral service is held in the home rather than in an official facility. A home funeral cuts down many of the common funeral costs and can be much more eco-friendly, but there are still many benefits to hosting a funeral or memorial at a funeral home. Unlike more traditional burials with embalming, heavily decorated caskets, and imported flowers, natural burials are all about keeping things simple. They use simple biodegradable urns, bamboo caskets, or cotton burial shrouds to minimize environmental impact and increase the speed of decomposition.

Call or visit us today if you have more questions on industry trends or cremation services in Langhorne, PA.

cremation service in Washington Crossing, PA

How to Become a Tree When You Die

Can you become a tree after your death and cremation service in Washington Crossing, PA? Yes! This internment option is when cremated remains are buried with tree seeds, and the remains nourish and sustain the tree as it grows. Cremation tree kits are easy, eco-friendly, and beautiful ways to plant trees from a loved one’s remains while honoring and celebrating your lost loved one’s life for generations to come.

Cremation tree urns are biodegradable urns designed to hold cremains, fertilizer, and tree seed. They also come with pH-neutralizing agents and fertilizers to help the cremains nourish the tree seed as it grows and flourishes into a free. When planted in the ground with cremains, cremation tree urns incorporate the cremains into the tree’s nourishment, turning your lost loved one’s remains into part of the tree, like a living memorial. There are many different types of trees you can plant with a cremation tree urn, including:

  • Jacaranda
  • Japanese Maple
  • Mexican Fan Palm
  • Oak
  • Palo Verde
  • Ponderosa Pine Tree
  • Quaking Aspen
  • Blue Spruce
  • Deodara Cedar
  • Dogwood
  • Eastern Red Bud
  • Flowering Cherry
  • Ginkgo Biloba
  • Sugar Maple
  • Tulip Poplar

Interested in planting a cremation tree with your lost loved one’s cremated remains? Each cremation tree kit will come with complete, specific instructions, but here’s a basic rundown of the process. Before you plant, look up the best type of environment for the tree, including sun exposure, water needs, and soil type, as you want to ensure that you set the tree up for success. After all, you want your lost loved one’s tree to be big and beautiful for generations to come.

Then, prepare the urn by removing the plastic wrap and locating the lower vessel for the cremains and the cap, which contains the nutrients for the tree. To prep the urn for planting, soak the seed packet as instructed, then place the wood pulp bag into the lower vessel along with no more than 1-1/4 cup of ashes, leaving enough room to fold it over and get the cap on. To plant the urn, place the cap or lid over the lower vessel, dig a six- to seven-inch-deep hole, and place the run upright into the hole so the lower vessel touches the bottom. Replace the soil so there’s no more than one inch of dirt covering the urn. Next, simply follow the watering directions for the tree type to ensure it will grow big, strong, and beautiful.

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It’s important to note that cremated remains don’t “expire”, so you can use your loved one’s cremains to plant a tree at any time, even years after their passing. However, after placing the cremains into the urn, you should plant the tree as soon as possible to ensure the seeds germinate and grow properly.

J. Allen Hooper Funeral Chapel is here to help if you want more tips on cremation trees or Washington Crossing, PA cremation services. Call or visit us today for more information on what we can do for you in your time of loss or of preplanning.

cremation service in Newtown, PA

Creative Alternatives to Traditional Memorials or Funerals

Thanks to new technology, flexibility in tradition, and creative people, there are many ways to celebrate your lost loved one with a funeral alternative. Your lost loved one was unique, so why honor their life with a standard memorial after a cremation service in Newtown, PA?

Here are creative funeral alternatives to help inspire you, like donating to science. If your lost loved one consented, you can donate their body to science. This donation comes at no cost to you or your family and goes a long way towards advancing medicine and healthcare. Plus, donations often come with a free cremation.

Go big with cremation fireworks or natural with a reef burial. Cremation fireworks take around three tablespoons of cremated remains, load them into a shell, and launch them into the sky. These beautiful displays are perfect send-offs for deceased who loved being the centers of attention. Did you know you can bury cremated remains in coral reefs? The cremated remains are mixed with cement and then placed in the reef. The cremains help nourish and build coral, contributing to the marine ecosystem and helping the deceased’s memory live on in nature. You can order a diamond made from your lost loved one’s cremains. The process uses about a half teaspoon of cremains, depending on the diamond size you want, and takes seven to 10 months. However, it’s well worth the wait to have a stunning memorial you can wear always.

What about a celebration of life? A celebration of life is all about celebrating your lost loved one’s life instead of mourning their passing. Most celebrations of life include sharing memories, jokes, and anecdotes about the deceased to help remember the good times. You could also do a scattering ceremony or make a memorial ornament. Scattering ceremonies are when you scatter or release your lost loved one’s cremated remains. There are many different ways to scatter cremations, from in the air or on the ground to in the water. From homemade personalized ornaments to custom, store-bought pieces, it’s easy to honor your loved one every holiday season with a memorial ornament.

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You can also plant a tree in memory of your lost loved one. Memorial trees are meaningful tributes that your family and friends can enjoy for generations to come. The memory of your lost loved one will live on for years. Virtual services became popular in 2020 and 2021, but they’re not going anywhere because of the opportunities for creativity they offer. Not only does no one have to travel for a virtual service, but you can create videos, slideshows, and other digital additions to make the memorial special. What about cremains portraits? Professional cremains portrait artists will mix some of your loved one’s cremated remains with paint and create a special portrait of him or her. It doesn’t take a lot of cremains, but the portrait will surely be cherished by family and friends for generations to come.

J. Allen Hooper Funeral Chapel is here to help if you want more inspiration or desire more information on Newtown, PA cremation services, as these are just a few ideas to inspire you for your loved one’s service. Call or visit us today.

cremation services in Langhorne, PA

Is Organ Donation Right for You?

Tissue and organ donation has wide-reaching benefits, as those who need skin, bones, ligaments, tendons, heart valves, and more often have no other options. While organ donation is a great choice for before cremation services in Langhorne, PA, it’s not necessary right for everyone. Should you donate your organs or not?

There are many reasons to donate your organs, including saving lives. It’s a fact that organ donation saves lives. Depending on your donation preferences, your organs can save up to eight different people if you choose to donate your heart, intestines, pancreas, liver, two lungs, two kidneys. If you choose to donate tissue, eyes, and other parts, your donation can improve and save the lives of even more people. There’s also finding meaning and moving the list.

Death is scary, but choosing to donate your organs will ensure there’s meaning in your death.

The organ donation list has over 107,000 people! By donating, you are moving the list so those people can get the help they need and so there’s more room on the list for new people that need help. Finally, donation helps advance science. Whole body donation to research is how most medical and scientific advancements are made. Your body can be used to study and treat diseases, development new medical procedures, and educate future generations of healthcare providers.

Here are some common reasons to not to donate to help guide your choice, like religion. Many religions forbid organ donation, oftentimes because they believe the body needs to be whole in order to reunite with the soul in the afterlife. The most common religions that discourage organ donation include Native Americans, Shintoists, Confucians, Roma Gypsies, and some Orthodox Jews. There are also personal beliefs. Some feel that organ donation doesn’t save lives, but instead that it only puts off the inevitable. Organ donation is your choice, so this belief is well within your right. Certain diseases or conditions including HIV, heart or kidney disease, cancer, and diabetes make organ donation unsafe for the donor and the recipient, and other people choose not to donate because of distrust.

Many people don’t want to donate their organs because they’re worried that medical professionals won’t work as hard to save their life so the doctors can harvest their organs. They don’t trust that doctors or hospitals will look out for their best interests. Also, others don’t want to donate because they don’t have any control over the recipient. In most cases, organ donors have no control over who will receive their organs or tissues. Instead, organs go to the next person on the list, no matter the donor’s preferences. Whether any or all of these reasons apply to you, or you’re not comfortable donating for another reason, you don’t have to do it. Simply make sure your family and loved ones are aware of and understand your feelings.

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Organ, tissue, and body donation is a personal choice. No one can decide for you, and no choice is wrong. J. Allen Hooper Funeral Chapel is here to help if you want to learn more about body donation or Langhorne, PA cremation services. Call or visit us today!

cremation service expenses in Langhorne, PA

Funeral Donations for Cremation Services

A funeral donation is money collected to pay for funeral or cremation service expenses in Langhorne, PA. This collection is not to be confused with memorial donations, which are when the family asks for donations to a charity in the deceased’s name.

While you can set up a donation anywhere or in any way you choose, there are two popular platforms used for funeral donations: Ever Loved and Go Fund Me. Ever Loved lets you create free memorial websites to both honor your loved one and ask for donations as needed. You can also set up funeral or memorial information so guests can RSVP and post memories of the deceased or condolences. Go Fund Me is a general crowdfunding platform that doesn’t specifically cater to funeral donations. However, it’s still a wonderful way to share your need and help others fill your need.

Funeral donations are an excellent way to ensure your lost loved one gets the service they deserve. Here is some helpful information on funeral donations:

  1. How Much Should You Give? The traditional gift is the amount you would have spent on flowers for the service, generally between $50 and $100.
  2. How Do You Ask for Donations? Asking for donations of any kind can be tough. To help, here are a few wording ideas that will inspire your own ask on whatever platform you choose: “We were simply not prepared for the cost of a funeral service. Any donation size is helpful as we try to give him the simple yet beautiful funeral he deserves.” “In lieu of flowers, the family asks donations be made to the funeral home to help cover costs.” “Many of you have asked how you can help my family during this very difficult time. We appreciate your consideration. We would also appreciate contributions to help pay for funeral expenses.” “The family asks those who wish to express sympathy to consider a donation to help with funeral costs.”
  3. Should You Give Money at the Funeral? You can! Simply place a check or cash in an envelope or card and leave it with the funeral director. You can also give the bereaved a digital gift through a payment app like Venmo or Zelle.
  4. Who Should You Make the Check to? Make the check out to the next of kin.
  5. How Much do Campaigns Cost? Even the “free” funeral donation platforms have fees, including credit card processing fees and service fees that range between 3% and 5%. For example, for every $100 you raise on one of those platforms, they would take approximately $3 in fees and leave you with $97.
  6. Do You Need to Be Related to the Deceased to Create a Campaign? No, anyone can set up a campaign for funeral donations.

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J. Allen Hooper Funeral Chapel is here to help if you want to learn more about funeral donations or other Langhorne, PA cremation services. After all, funeral donations help the bereaved with costs associated with a service, from cremation and urns to burial, wakes and more, but you might still have more funeral questions.

cremation service in Washington Crossing, PA

Common Types of Grief After Cremation Services

There are certain types of grief that are common after a loss and a cremation service in Washington Crossing, PA. Professionals identify types of grief to give people a better understanding of their feelings and actions so they can better heal and move forward. Here are some of the most common types of grief:

  • Inhibited – This type of grief is feelings of loss that manifest as physical ailments like muscle aches, headaches, stomach pain, or other issues.
  • Chronic – As the name denotes, chronic grief is long lasting. While most people mourn for years after a loss, those with chronic grief have debilitating symptoms for long periods of time.
  • Complicated – Complicated grief is best characterized by grief that worsens over time. While it might start out simple, it deepens as the months pass into a disabling and sometimes life-changing feeling.
  • Traumatic – This type of grief is common after the sudden loss of a loved one as this type of unexpected death can be considered traumatic for most people.
  • Anticipatory – Anticipatory grief is what you feel when you know a loved one is going to die but they haven’t passed yet, such as when they’re suffering from a terminal illness.
  • Disenfranchised – This type of grief comes when you lose a relationship that’s considered outside the normal family structure or outside the normal definition of recognized relationships. Sometimes called hidden grief, disenfranchised grief is common after an abortion, the loss of a pet, or even the death of a casual friend.
  • Exaggerated – For many, exaggerated grief starts normal but grows in intensity as time passes, often leading to anger, self-harm, and other destructive feelings or actions.
  • Distorted – Distorted grief is characterized by feelings of anger and guilt instead of common feelings of loss and sadness. For example, a parent who feels angry after the loss of a child.
  • Collective – Collective grief is a loss felt by a large group of people, such as when a celebrity dies or there’s a tragedy like 9-11 or the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Abbreviated –Most common after the loss of someone that you weren’t particularly close with, abbreviated grief is when the grief is short but real.
  • Cumulative – Cumulative grief is when a new loss brings back feelings of grief from a previous loss, such as another death, a move, or even the loss of a job, and those feelings compound one another.
  • AbsentAbsent grief is when you show few or even no signs of grief. Sometimes used as a defense mechanism, absent grief is easy to write off. But it’s important to remember that there’s no way to tell from the outside how someone is truly feeling.
  • Delayed – Delayed grief, like the name denotes, is when grief is postponed for a period of time because you haven’t accepted the loss, you feel like you can’t feel the loss, or another reason for putting off your feelings.

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Do you want more information on loss, grief, or Washington Crossing, PA cremation services? J. Allen Hooper Funeral Chapel is here to do whatever we can for you in your time of loss. Call or visit us today.

cremation service in Newtown, PA

Elisabeth Kubler-Ross’s Five Stages of Grief

Grief doesn’t come all at once or all in the same way, it often moves through stages: Denial, Anger, Bargaining, Depression, and Acceptance. The five stages of grief are a well-known blueprint that helps people understand how they grief and offers guidance on how to get through a loss and a cremation service in Newtown, PA. Keep reading to learn more about the stages and how they might be able to help you.

Dr. Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, a Swiss-American psychologist, first developed these five stages in 1969 to help illustrate that fact that, while every human experience grief differently, almost everyone moves through one or many of these five stages at some point in the grieving process. Some people might move through all, others just one, and more still might experience only a few. While it’s not a comprehensive guideline, the 5 stages of grief do help, comfort, and basic understanding of how we experience grief and how that experience changes over time. The order of the five stages isn’t necessarily important, as people might experience them in varying orders and intensities, even moving back and forth between them.

Denial is when you don’t want to believe or an unable to believe that your loved one has died. The “this can’t be happening to me” reaction is very normal, and is usually the first reaction after a loss. Denial can also come in the form of telling people you’re fine even though you’re not because you’re denying your true feelings of grief.

Anger generally sets in when you realize you can’t deny or fight the loss any longer. You might become angry at the people around you, taking your anger out on doctors and nurses who “failed” your loved one or on yourself for making a mistake that might have led to or worsened the situation. Some even direct their anger toward God or a higher power. Bargaining is when you deny the truth by trying to change it. It might manifest as trying to get the doctors to bring in another expert or try a new treatment, or as pleading with God or a higher power for more time or a different outcome. Like the name sounds, depression is when you feel hopeless or that you can’t go on because of the loss. You might feel overwhelmed, alone, and lost.

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Acceptance is the last stage. During acceptance, you come to terms with the fact that your loved one is or is going to be gone. The grief and pain don’t go away in this stage, but you do accept and feel those feelings. When you reach the fifth stage of grief, you begin to plan on how you will move on with your life.

The five stages of grief are a helpful tool for anyone dealing with a loss or a service at a Newtown, PA funeral home. J. Allen Hooper Funeral Chapel is here to help if you need help with your needs in this time of loss.

cremation service in Langhorne, PA

What Do You Know About Urns?

If you’re like most people, the first time you’ve ever thought about cremation urns is right before or after a cremation service in Langhorne, PA. But it always better to be prepared. Here is a list of things you should know about cremation urns to help you get ready for the death of a loved one or to prepare for your own passing.

Use exterior measurements for placement. Do check an urn’s exterior measurements to make sure that it will fit in the place of your choosing. For example, if you want to house the urn in a columbarium niche, make sure it fits the niche’s dimensions. Or, if you want to keep the urn on your mantle, ensure it’s not too wide or too tall to fit safely. You can pre-purchase urns. If you’re planning for your own eventual passing, you can prepurchase a cremation urn. This way, you’ll not only ensure that you get the urn that you want but you will also take one thing off your loved one’s to-do list. Simply store your urn in a box until its needed.

Capacity is important. While you should check an urn’s exterior measurements to see if it will suit your needs, you also need to check its capacity to make sure it will fit the cremains. Many urns have decorative edges or accents, making exterior dimensions useless when it comes to determining the urn’s interior size. Always double check an urn’s interior dimensions before you make a purchase. The funeral home will transfer the remains for you. Since funeral homes are required to use a cremation container of your choosing, they will transfer the cremated remains into that container for you.

A Cremation urn is just a container. An urn can be whatever kind of container you want or need it to be. As long as the container can hold the cremated remains, it counts as a cremation urn. You can rent an urn for a service. If you only want to have an urn for a funeral or memorial service, you can rent one. This is a great way to save money if you’d rather use the expensive, fancy urn for the service but want to scatter, bury, or otherwise inter the ashes afterward. Most funeral homes or cremation providers have a selection of urns you can rent, so check with your provider. You don’t have to buy a cremation urn from a funeral home or cremation provider. While its often very convenient to get a cremation urn from your provider, you don’t have to. You can buy an urn online, at a store, or wherever you can find one. You can also make an urn or use the one that comes free with the cremation.

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J. Allen Hooper Funeral Chapel is here to help if you need help planning a Langhorne, PA cremation service. Call or visit us today to learn more about what we can do for you in your time of loss or of preplanning.