Monthly Archives: March 2022

cremation services in Langhorne, PA

Is Organ Donation Right for You?

Tissue and organ donation has wide-reaching benefits, as those who need skin, bones, ligaments, tendons, heart valves, and more often have no other options. While organ donation is a great choice for before cremation services in Langhorne, PA, it’s not necessary right for everyone. Should you donate your organs or not?

There are many reasons to donate your organs, including saving lives. It’s a fact that organ donation saves lives. Depending on your donation preferences, your organs can save up to eight different people if you choose to donate your heart, intestines, pancreas, liver, two lungs, two kidneys. If you choose to donate tissue, eyes, and other parts, your donation can improve and save the lives of even more people. There’s also finding meaning and moving the list.

Death is scary, but choosing to donate your organs will ensure there’s meaning in your death.

The organ donation list has over 107,000 people! By donating, you are moving the list so those people can get the help they need and so there’s more room on the list for new people that need help. Finally, donation helps advance science. Whole body donation to research is how most medical and scientific advancements are made. Your body can be used to study and treat diseases, development new medical procedures, and educate future generations of healthcare providers.

Here are some common reasons to not to donate to help guide your choice, like religion. Many religions forbid organ donation, oftentimes because they believe the body needs to be whole in order to reunite with the soul in the afterlife. The most common religions that discourage organ donation include Native Americans, Shintoists, Confucians, Roma Gypsies, and some Orthodox Jews. There are also personal beliefs. Some feel that organ donation doesn’t save lives, but instead that it only puts off the inevitable. Organ donation is your choice, so this belief is well within your right. Certain diseases or conditions including HIV, heart or kidney disease, cancer, and diabetes make organ donation unsafe for the donor and the recipient, and other people choose not to donate because of distrust.

Many people don’t want to donate their organs because they’re worried that medical professionals won’t work as hard to save their life so the doctors can harvest their organs. They don’t trust that doctors or hospitals will look out for their best interests. Also, others don’t want to donate because they don’t have any control over the recipient. In most cases, organ donors have no control over who will receive their organs or tissues. Instead, organs go to the next person on the list, no matter the donor’s preferences. Whether any or all of these reasons apply to you, or you’re not comfortable donating for another reason, you don’t have to do it. Simply make sure your family and loved ones are aware of and understand your feelings.

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Organ, tissue, and body donation is a personal choice. No one can decide for you, and no choice is wrong. J. Allen Hooper Funeral Chapel is here to help if you want to learn more about body donation or Langhorne, PA cremation services. Call or visit us today!

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Funeral Donations for Cremation Services

A funeral donation is money collected to pay for funeral or cremation service expenses in Langhorne, PA. This collection is not to be confused with memorial donations, which are when the family asks for donations to a charity in the deceased’s name.

While you can set up a donation anywhere or in any way you choose, there are two popular platforms used for funeral donations: Ever Loved and Go Fund Me. Ever Loved lets you create free memorial websites to both honor your loved one and ask for donations as needed. You can also set up funeral or memorial information so guests can RSVP and post memories of the deceased or condolences. Go Fund Me is a general crowdfunding platform that doesn’t specifically cater to funeral donations. However, it’s still a wonderful way to share your need and help others fill your need.

Funeral donations are an excellent way to ensure your lost loved one gets the service they deserve. Here is some helpful information on funeral donations:

  1. How Much Should You Give? The traditional gift is the amount you would have spent on flowers for the service, generally between $50 and $100.
  2. How Do You Ask for Donations? Asking for donations of any kind can be tough. To help, here are a few wording ideas that will inspire your own ask on whatever platform you choose: “We were simply not prepared for the cost of a funeral service. Any donation size is helpful as we try to give him the simple yet beautiful funeral he deserves.” “In lieu of flowers, the family asks donations be made to the funeral home to help cover costs.” “Many of you have asked how you can help my family during this very difficult time. We appreciate your consideration. We would also appreciate contributions to help pay for funeral expenses.” “The family asks those who wish to express sympathy to consider a donation to help with funeral costs.”
  3. Should You Give Money at the Funeral? You can! Simply place a check or cash in an envelope or card and leave it with the funeral director. You can also give the bereaved a digital gift through a payment app like Venmo or Zelle.
  4. Who Should You Make the Check to? Make the check out to the next of kin.
  5. How Much do Campaigns Cost? Even the “free” funeral donation platforms have fees, including credit card processing fees and service fees that range between 3% and 5%. For example, for every $100 you raise on one of those platforms, they would take approximately $3 in fees and leave you with $97.
  6. Do You Need to Be Related to the Deceased to Create a Campaign? No, anyone can set up a campaign for funeral donations.

cremation service expenses in Langhorne, PA

J. Allen Hooper Funeral Chapel is here to help if you want to learn more about funeral donations or other Langhorne, PA cremation services. After all, funeral donations help the bereaved with costs associated with a service, from cremation and urns to burial, wakes and more, but you might still have more funeral questions.

cremation service in Washington Crossing, PA

Common Types of Grief After Cremation Services

There are certain types of grief that are common after a loss and a cremation service in Washington Crossing, PA. Professionals identify types of grief to give people a better understanding of their feelings and actions so they can better heal and move forward. Here are some of the most common types of grief:

  • Inhibited – This type of grief is feelings of loss that manifest as physical ailments like muscle aches, headaches, stomach pain, or other issues.
  • Chronic – As the name denotes, chronic grief is long lasting. While most people mourn for years after a loss, those with chronic grief have debilitating symptoms for long periods of time.
  • Complicated – Complicated grief is best characterized by grief that worsens over time. While it might start out simple, it deepens as the months pass into a disabling and sometimes life-changing feeling.
  • Traumatic – This type of grief is common after the sudden loss of a loved one as this type of unexpected death can be considered traumatic for most people.
  • Anticipatory – Anticipatory grief is what you feel when you know a loved one is going to die but they haven’t passed yet, such as when they’re suffering from a terminal illness.
  • Disenfranchised – This type of grief comes when you lose a relationship that’s considered outside the normal family structure or outside the normal definition of recognized relationships. Sometimes called hidden grief, disenfranchised grief is common after an abortion, the loss of a pet, or even the death of a casual friend.
  • Exaggerated – For many, exaggerated grief starts normal but grows in intensity as time passes, often leading to anger, self-harm, and other destructive feelings or actions.
  • Distorted – Distorted grief is characterized by feelings of anger and guilt instead of common feelings of loss and sadness. For example, a parent who feels angry after the loss of a child.
  • Collective – Collective grief is a loss felt by a large group of people, such as when a celebrity dies or there’s a tragedy like 9-11 or the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Abbreviated –Most common after the loss of someone that you weren’t particularly close with, abbreviated grief is when the grief is short but real.
  • Cumulative – Cumulative grief is when a new loss brings back feelings of grief from a previous loss, such as another death, a move, or even the loss of a job, and those feelings compound one another.
  • AbsentAbsent grief is when you show few or even no signs of grief. Sometimes used as a defense mechanism, absent grief is easy to write off. But it’s important to remember that there’s no way to tell from the outside how someone is truly feeling.
  • Delayed – Delayed grief, like the name denotes, is when grief is postponed for a period of time because you haven’t accepted the loss, you feel like you can’t feel the loss, or another reason for putting off your feelings.

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Do you want more information on loss, grief, or Washington Crossing, PA cremation services? J. Allen Hooper Funeral Chapel is here to do whatever we can for you in your time of loss. Call or visit us today.

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Body Donation and Funeral Home Services

Body donation is a common choice for before or after a funeral home service in Washington Crossing, PA. Want to learn more about body donation? Here are answers to some of the most commonly asked questions:

  • Are there different kinds of body donation? There are several ways to donate your body. The first is organ donation, which is when someone donates their organs like heart, lungs, kidneys, or liver for transplant. Organ donation, depending on the organ being donated, can be performed when the donator is alive or deceased. If the donator is deceased, the organs must be removed immediately after death in order to remain viable. There is also tissue donation, when a deceased person donates body tissue such as skin, heart valves, ligaments, bones, veins, or corneas. The final most common type is full-body donation, or when a deceased person donates their entire body to science like a medical or scientific program for research. Body donation, no matter the type, is a noble, important act.
  • Are there extra funeral costs for being an organ donor? More work goes into preparing a donor’s body. However, most funeral homes do not charge extra out of respect for the deceased’s choice to save or benefit others through donation.
  • Can organ donors have an open casket? Depending on the type of donation, the deceased can still have an open casket. Funeral homes can hide any signs of donation, embalm, dress, and place the body in a casket.
  • How long does organ donation take? Depending on which organs are recovered, the procedure can range anywhere from four to six hours in length as the doctors must remove the organs as quickly as possible to keep them viable for transplantation.
  • Can you still have a funeral if you donate your organs? Yes! Body donation, whether organ or tissue, often has little to no effect on your funeral service plans. This is especially true if you plan to have a closed casket or choose to be cremated
  • Do organ donors get free cremation? Usually, no. After the medical professional completes the necessary donation procedures, they will call the funeral home to come pick up the body and perform the chosen final disposition. However, free cremation is generally included in full-body donation.
  • Can I still be cremated if I’m an organ donor? The organ or body donation process does not have any effect on cremation.
  • How long do organs last after death? Harvesting organs or tissues is generally done within the first 24 hours after a death, but the sooner the better to maintain viability.
  • Will organ donation delay the funeral? On average, funeral or memorial services take place about a week after a death. Therefore, organ donation is easily performed long before any service takes place.

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Body donation saves and improves lives all over the world every single day. J. Allen Hooper Funeral Chapel is here to help if you want to learn more about body donation or Washington Crossing, PA funeral homes. Call or visit us today to learn more about what we can do for you in your time of loss.