cremation service in Washington Crossing, PA

Considering Keeping Cremains at Home?

Are you considering keeping your lost loved one’s cremains at home after their cremation service in Washington Crossing, PA? Many people choose to keep their lost loved one’s cremains at home because they want to keep them close even in death or because they want to honor and preserve the memory of their lost loved one’s life in the comfort of their own home.

But how do you keep cremains at home? Start with these tips for inspiration and guidance.

You can try memorial shelves or keeping them in a closet. You can purchase a shelf with a hidden compartment for the cremains so you can keep them out and about in a non-obvious way. Many people choose to display photos or keepsakes of the deceased on the memorial shelf. Many people choose to keep their loved one’s cremains on a shelf in a closet as it may be simply too painful to display them in a prominent place as a reminder of the loss. What about glass art? Many artisans will infuse cremains into glass and then use that glass to create art. From sculptures to paperweights, the small amount of cremains is forever housed between layers of melted glass and different colors of your choosing. You can also keep their cremains in a cremation urn. There are many urns to choose from, from large and ornate to small and minimalist. There are also urns in almost every price point, making it easy for you to find one that works with your budget.

There are also memorial plants and teddy bear urns. Use the cremains as fertilizer for a tree or other plant that you can keep in your home. This is a wonderful way to keep the memory of your lost loved one alive and growing for years to come. Teddy bear urns are soft teddy bears with compartments inside to house cremated remains. Many people choose teddy bear urns if they’d like to cuddle the cremains as a way of soothing themselves and mourning the loss of their loved one.

You can also make cremation jewelry or cremation paintings. Cremation jewelry uses small amounts of the cremains and turns them into a precious gem you can wear as jewelry. Another type of cremation jewelry features a small compartment in a locket, bracelet, or other jewelry item in which you can keep a small portion of the cremains so they’re always close to you. An artist can mix gels, oils, acrylics, or watercolors with your loved one’s cremated remains and produce a beautiful work of art. The art can be a portrait of your lost loved one or a simple painting of something that symbolizes their life or has some significance to you and their memory.

cremation service in Washington Crossing, PA

We are here to offer our expertise if you want more tips on keeping cremains at home or need more information on Washington Crossing, PA cremation services. Call or visit us today to learn more about what we can do for you in your time of loss or preplanning.

funeral home service in Washington Crossing, PA

Can You Keep Cremains at Home?

What can you do with a loved one’s cremated remains after a funeral home service in Washington Crossing, PA? There are many options from scattering and burying them to interring them in a columbarium.

You can also keep cremated remains at home. If you’ve got questions about keeping cremated remains at home, these common questions and their answers are here to help:

  1. Can you keep cremated remains at home? Yes, you can keep cremate remains at home. There is nothing weird, harmful, or unsafe about keeping cremated remains in your home. Cremated ashes are clean and sanitary. The process of cremation has eliminated any potential contamination. What’s more, cremains are kept secure in a bag, making it very difficult for someone to tamper with them or spill them.
  2. Is it legal to keep cremated remains in a house? It is not illegal to keep cremated remains in a house. There are also no laws against scattering or burying cremains on your personal property.
  3. How long can ashes be kept after cremation? Cremated remains are sterile and static, meaning they don’t have any bacteria and will not decompose. This is because the high heat used to cremate the body is hot enough to kill bacteria and rapidly break down any substances that would decompose naturally over time. Therefore, you can keep cremated remains as long as you’d like.
  4. What do you do if you don’t want the cremated remains? If you don’t want the deceased’s cremains, you can either have someone else bury them, scatter them, or otherwise inter them or you can leave them at the crematory or funeral home for them to dispose of.
  5. Does the Bible say anything about keeping cremains at home? The Bible neither advocates nor condemns the act of cremation or keeping your loved one’s cremated remains in your home. The closest thing to keeping cremains at home that the Bible mentions is the story of King Saul’s men burning his son’s bodies to cleanse them and respect their memories.
  6. Can the funeral home dispose of the ashes for me? Some funeral homes and crematories will dispose of cremated remains for you, but you must give them clear instructions as to what you want done with the remains.
  7. Is it bad luck to keep cremains in your house? It’s easy to understand why some people might think it’s bad luck to keep cremated remains in their house, but it’s not. Certain religions or belief systems might discourage keeping cremains in a home, but that doesn’t mean its unlucky. Others might feel keeping cremains at home will bring in a bad energy, but still others find it makes them feel better to have their loved one close. It all depends on personal preferences and beliefs.

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We are here to help if you want to learn more about keeping cremated remains at home or about Washington Crossing, PA funeral homes. Please give us a call or pay us a visit for more information on our services.

cremation service in Newtown, PA

Do You Want a Living Memorial?

A living memorial might be one of the best ways to honor a lost loved one after their cremation service in Newtown, PA by celebrating their life. Living memorials are memorials that are also living things, like trees or plants. They are all about shifting the focus away from death and loss and onto celebrating a life well lived and how the memory of that life will go in in the lives of friends and family.

There are several types of living memorials to help inspire your celebration of your loved one’s life, like keepsake seeds. If you’re hosting a memorial or a funeral for your lost loved one, you can send attendees home with keepsake seed packets and instructions to plant the seeds in memory of the deceased. This way, your loved one’s memory will live on in many plants spread out with those that loved him or her most. You can give seeds of your loved one’s favorite flower or choose a simple plant that’s easy to care for.

Planting a tree in honor of a lost loved one is a wonderful way to celebrate their life and give back the community and the planet. If your loved one is buried far away or if you scattered their remains, a memorial tree is also a great place for you to visit, grieve, and remember. When choosing the type of tree and the location, be sure to do research into local weather and regulations regarding planting. There are also lots of organizations that will plant a memorial tree for you. Many will also send you a certificate showing where the tree was planted. Living wreaths are another option.

What about bird feeder memorials? While bird feeders themselves aren’t living, they do bring around lots of lovely, living birds to honor your lost loved one. A beautiful bird feeder feeds and nourishes local birds with a food source and brings you a sense of joy and comfort every time you look out your window and remember your lost loved one. There are also memorial trees from cremains or memorial trees. If you choose to cremate your lost loved one, you can plant a memorial tree from their ashes. This incorporates their cremains into the tree growing process so, in a way, your loved one will live on in the tree. You can purchase a memorial tree planting kit that has all the tools and instructions you need to plant a tree from your loved one’s ashes.

Living wreaths are just like standard wreaths except that they are made from living plants and will therefore last longer than dried wreaths. Wreaths like these can be displayed by hanging or in a saucer or plate on a table or counter for a long-lasting living memorial wreath.

We are here to offer our expertise if you want to learn more about living memorials or Newtown, PA cremation services. Call or visit us more information about what we can do for you in your time of loss.

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How Long After Death?

Have you ever wondered about the timeline for a funeral home service in Newtown, PA after a death? You’re not alone. Many people have lots of “how long” or timeline questions when it comes to death, funerals, and cremation services. Whether you’re preplanning for your own passing or dealing with the recent loss of a loved one, here’s everything you might have wondered about the cremation timeline, from time of death to receiving the remains back:

  1. How long can a dead body be kept at home? It is illegal to keep a dead body at home in almost every state, though the exact amount of time varies from state to state. Be sure to check your local laws to ensure you’re not breaking them. However, most states will allow you to keep a body a home until the cremation.
  2. How long is the time between death and cremation? There are many factors that determine the amount of time between death and cremation. In general, most states have a waiting period before a cremation can occur. If you’re using a national cremation provider, it could take anywhere from 10 to 15 days. If you work with a local facility, it could take between two and three days. The biggest determining factor is how quickly you get a death certificate signed by a doctor, as you can’t get a cremation until you have a signed death certificate.
  3. How long does cremation take? The cremation takes around three hours, but the processing of the remains can also take two to three more hours. If the cremation takes place early enough in the day, you can get the cremated remains back the same day. But, generally, you will get cremains back one to three days after the cremation is complete. As each provider’s schedule is different, be sure to talk to your cremation provider for a specific timeline.
  4. How long after death does the funeral home pick up the body? The exact time it takes for a funeral home or cremation provider to pick up a body depends on a few factors. For example, you must have a doctor or nurse pronounce the body dead and, after the body is released, provide paperwork. Also, some funeral homes are flexible and will allow you more time to say goodbye if you prefer.
  5. How long is the time between death and a funeral service? The time between death and a funeral service depends on religion, preference, and embalming. Some religions dictate that a funeral must take place as soon as a day or two after the death, but in other cases the bereaved might have to wait a week or longer for family to come in from out of town. If the body is embalmed, the funeral can be up to two weeks after the death.
  6. How long after a funeral is the body cremated? A cremation can happen immediately after a funeral or up to two weeks later, depending on the funeral home or cremation provider’s availability and if the body is embalmed.

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We are here to help if you have more questions about Newtown, PA funeral homes. Call or visit us today to learn more.

cremation services in Langhorne, PA

Weird Cremation Service Facts

From the icky to the bizarre, its normal to have questions about cremation and want to learn more about it. In fact, lots of people wonder a lot of odd or quirky things about cremation services in Langhorne, PA. Here are the answers to some of the most common weird cremation questions.

  • Are bodies cremated in their caskets? Bodies will be removed from their caskets if the caskets are not suitable for cremation. But, if the casket is able to be cremated, the body will be cremated while still inside the casket.
  • Is cremation common? The National Funeral Directors Association states the current rate of cremation is about 56%, while traditional burial is 37%. In short, it is safe to say that cremation is the most common disposition method in the country.
  • Are the ashes really the person? Cremation ashes, sometimes called cremains, are the bits of bones leftover after the cremation process. So yes, the ashes really are the person. Every cremation provider has safety and identification protocols in place to ensure that the proper cremains are returned to the proper family, so you can rest assured the ashes you receive are the ashes of your lost loved one.
  • Do teeth burn during cremation? Teeth usually burn up during the cremation process. Tooth fragments that are not burnt up will be ground during the ash processing.
  • Do cremains have DNA? Cremains rarely hold enough DNA to be read during an analysis. The bone and teeth fragments left behind after the process are ground into a fine powder, making it almost impossible to extract viable DNA for testing.
  • Can you be cremated without a funeral? You can be cremated without a funeral service. This is called direct cremation. Your loved ones can always have a memorial service at a later date after the cremation if they or you so choose.
  • Are bodies cremated with clothes on? Bodies are cremated in what they died in if they are cremated with direct cremation. If they’re cremated after a funeral, they will be cremated in the clothes they were placed in for the service.
  • Do bodies sit up during cremation? Because of the cremation chamber’s high heat, some bodies go into what’s called a pugilistic stance, meaning the elbows, knees, and fists clench from dehydration due to the extreme heat. The pugilistic stance may make the body appear shorter or stiffer, but it will not make the body sit up.
  • What is the most affordable way to be cremated? Whole-body donations, or donating the entire body to science, comes with a no-cost cremation, making it the most affordable way to be cremated.
  • Can you watch a cremation? Some cremation providers do allow the bereaved to view the cremation from a separate chamber. However, as the entire process takes several hours, most only allow the bereaved to view the body being placed into the cremation chamber.

cremation services in Langhorne, PA

Do you have more questions about Langhorne, PA cremation services? We are here to help. Please call or visit us today to learn about what we can do for you in your time of loss, preplanning, or curiosity.

funeral home in Langhorne, PA

How to Save Money on a Funeral Home Service

Funerals can be expensive. And for most people, that’s just fine. Funerals are a big deal and oftentimes the memories of your lost loved one and meaningful moments honoring their life are worth the expense. But for some, it’s important to save money on a funeral or a memorial so they can spend it on other things that are equally important. And that’s OK, too. What do you do if you don’t have a big budget for a service at a funeral home in Langhorne, PA?

However, working within a small budget can be hard, especially for people who have big dreams of what they want their lost loved one’s service to look like. If you’re worried about the cost of a memorial, maybe it’s time to cut back on the budget. Think about it this way – you won’t be stressed about bills or money, and you’ll actually be able to soak in the time spent honoring and remembering your loved one. Not sure how to decrease your budget to save you money?

Here are some tips for cutting down your funeral or memorial budget. You can make cuts to the guest list. This is the simplest way to save money on a memorial. Think about it like this: a 300-person memorial reception will automatically be twice as expensive as a 150-person reception. Pare down your guest list to just people you really know and really love, and you’ll see your budget go way down. However, don’t skimp on the venue. The one thing you shouldn’t try and scrimp on? The funeral home has such a massive impact on the entire day, so don’t try and cut back there. Instead, use these tips for other ways to save money.

You can also DIY as much as possible. While there are some aspects of a memorial you don’t want to DIY, like preparing the body, there are tons of things you can. For example, make your centerpieces, create your own floral arrangements, design your own programs, or ask friend and family to help with set up and tear down. There’s also the option of DIYing the food at the reception following the service if you want to go with a more casual vibe and your venue allows. What about skipping stationary? The cost of paper death announcements and funeral invitations really adds up. Luckily, there are tons of digital platforms that will send these out for free. If you’re set on having paper invitations, consider mixing them with a digital RSVP system. You can also cut things like day-of programs, and menu cards as they always get thrown out anyway. Instead, try big chalkboard signs that can give the same information for way less than half the cost.

funeral home in Langhorne, PA

As a Langhorne, PA funeral home, we have the expertise needed to make your lost loved one’s service the best it can be, no matter what your budget. Call or visit us today to learn more about our services and what we can for you in your time of loss.

cremation service in Washington Crossing, PA

How to Offer Sympathy to Coworkers

Workplace relationships are already tricky, but they can get even trickier when one of your coworkers loses a loved one and has to plan a cremation service in Washington Crossing, PA. Situations like these can be very difficult to navigate as it’s hard to know what to say or what to do to be helpful and comforting but still professional. What do you do? How to you express sympathy while still remaining professional?

There are a few ways to go about it. For example, if you’re speaking to a bereaved coworker from just yourself, you can say things like: “My heart goes out to you during this difficult time.”, “Please let me know if I can help in any way.”, “My warm thoughts and sincere prayers are with you and your loved ones.”, or “Please know I’m here for you in this season of mourning.” If you’re speaking on behalf of a team or the entire company, try something like: “We are fully behind you and however much time you need! You have the sincere condolences of the entire team in this challenging time.”, or “On behalf of the company, we are here to help you through this.”

Oftentimes the easiest and best way to convey condolences in a professional setting is via email. Here are some tips for writing a professional condolences email, like don’t make it about you. Phrases like “I know how you feel” aren’t helpful and may make the recipient feel as if you’re not seeing them in their specific pain. Instead, share a memory of their lost loved one. Be professional in tone and style and use a simple subject line. Its best to avoid unprofessional or flippant writing.

Therefore, don’t use things like slang, cliches, or emojis. Be sure to make your subject line clear and simple so they know the message isn’t about work but is instead about their loss. Try something like: “My Condolences” or “With Deepest Sympathy.” Also, not everyone shares the same religious beliefs. Don’t assume they believe in the afterlife by using generic expressions like “they’re in a better place.” You can, however, say you will pray for them if that is in line with your beliefs or religion. You should also offer specific help. Don’t offer advice. Instead, offer to help in specific ways. For example, you could offer to deliver a home cooked meal, send a gift card for a grocery delivery service, or send a bouquet of their favorite flowers. No matter how you offer to help, don’t be too pushy or insistent.

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Finally, sign off professionally and proofread. Though this email is personal in nature, you should still sign off in a professional manner. Avoid signing off with sentiments like, “All of my love,” as it can be too informal. Instead use “All my best” or “With sympathy” before signing.

We are here to help if you want more tips on dealing with workplace loss or planning Washington Crossing, PA cremation services. Call or visit us today to learn more about what we can do for you in our time of loss or preplanning.

funeral home in Washington Crossing, PA

Want to Learn More About Embalming?

As a recap, embalming is preserving human remains to slow decomposition, generally performed to make the body presentable for a funeral or service. Embalming is also often used to keep bodies preserved for medical purposes in anatomical laboratories or schools.

Let’s go even deeper into embalming and what it has to do with services at funeral home in Washington Crossing, PA.

Here are the answers to some of the most commonly asked questions about embalming. To begin, do bodies have to be embalmed? Though it’s quite common, embalming is rarely necessary. It is not required when the body is cremated, though most funeral homes do require embalming for viewings or open casket funeral services. Do you have to embalm the body for an open casket funeral? Most states do not have laws that require embalming before a public viewing or an open casket funeral, though most funeral homes will not allow a viewing if the body is not embalmed.

Can you cremate an embalmed body? Yes! Embalming does not impact the cremation process. What happens if a body is not embalmed? Bodies that are not embalmed will decompose at their normal rate, depending on the cause of death, weight of deceased, temperature, moisture levels, and other factors. If the body is not embalmed, you will need to hold the service, burial, or cremation as soon as possible after the death. How long does embalming take? The entire embalming process takes an average of two hours, but it can take longer if the deceased was in an accident or had an autopsy, as this requires additional steps to make the body presentable for a service. What about how long an embalmed body lasts? Embalming does not stop decomposition; it just slows it down. Though the rate of decomposition varies depending on temperature, moisture levels, and other variables, an embalmed body will last inside a casket for many years. However, the goal of embalming is to make the body look as good as possible for the funeral, usually about a week after the process. If you plan on having an open-casket funeral, you should not leave the embalmed body out for more than a week.

funeral home in Washington Crossing, PA

What are your options for internment of an embalmed body? Once a body is embalmed, you can bury it or cremate it as you prefer. You cannot, however, bury it with a natural burial because the embalming chemicals could leak into the ground and harm the environment. Are organs removed during embalming? The organs are left inside the body cavity during the embalming process. However, the embalmer does drain all of the blood from the body and replaces with embalming fluid. They then flush the blood and other waste down a drain and into the sewage system, at which point it goes through the local wastewater treatment process.

We are here to help if you have more questions about embalming or Washington Crossing, PA funeral homes. Call or visit us today for more information on our services and what we can do for you in your time of loss or preplanning.

cremation service in Newtown, PA

Inspiration for Military Funeral Flags

Do you want to learn about military funeral flags and what you should do with them after a cremation service in Newtown, PA? This article is for you!

To begin, military funeral flag is a standard United States flag that’s draped over the coffin or urn of a veteran or military service member during their funeral, memorial, or internment. Also known as a military burial flag, the flag is folded up after the service is over 13 times to form a triangle, perhaps representing the 13 original colonies and the shape of the hats traditionally worn during the Revolutionary War. After its folded, the flag is given to the deceased’s closest family member, like a spouse, parents, sibling, or other next of kin. The VA provides funeral flags ate no cost for both active duty and retired veterans of any of the armed force divisions. Civilians can request flags, but they do come at a cost.

There are several options that both honor the memory of your lost loved one and respect the nature of the flag. Some of them include:

  • Buy a Memorabilia and Flag Display Case – Showcase your lost loved one’s military memorabilia and their funeral flag with a special display case. Such cases are perfect to exhibit awards, patches, photos, insignia, and more. You can choose a wall-mountable or standing versions of this kind of case so you can display memorabilia and the flag wherever it fits best in your home.
  • Choose an Urn Base Display Case – If your lost loved one was cremated, you can buy a flag display case that is designed to fit perfectly on top of their cremation urn. This way, you can keep your lost loved one’s remains and their funeral flag in the same place.
  • Buy a Personalized Military Flag Case – There are many flag cases available for sale, such as personalized cases that display the veteran’s service branch, name, and rank. The wooden case keeps the flag free from dust, and a felt-lined lid provides an area to proudly display awards and insignia.
  • Fly the Flag – While the official United States Flag Code does not mention whether or not you are allowed to fly a military funeral flag, there are two main factions divided on this issue. Some believe that once a funeral flag is folded it should remain that way, meaning it cannot be flown. Others believe flying the flag is a noble and patriotic way of honoring the deceased.
  • Display the Flag in a Homemade Case – Make your own case to display the funeral flag on your mantle, on a shelf, or on a wall. This is a great way to invest time and meaningful craftsmanship into honoring your lost loved one.

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We are here to help if you want more information on military funeral flags or Newtown, PA cremation services. Call or visit us today to learn more about our services and what we can do to help during your time of loss or preplanning.

funeral home in Newtown, PA

Crowning Ceremony Crowns for Funeral Homes

What is a crowning ceremony at a funeral home in Newtown, PA? What does is symbolize? What are crowning ceremony crowns?

The act of a crowning ceremony, even removed from the context of homegoing, is to offer a final gift of grace to the deceased which they may not have received in life, serving as a recognition of their importance in the lives of others and a crowning of the life they lived. You can also view a crowning ceremony as a way to put a more positive spin on a traditional funeral, making it an event that allows for the wide range of emotions that come with losing a friend, family member, or loved one. In crowning ceremonies held during services at funeral homes, a crown is presented by a family member or officiant and then placed on the deceased’s head inside the coffin. Those in attendance also sing group songs and hymns, give sympathies to the family of the deceased, and generally celebrate the deceased’s life on earth. Crowns used in funeral crowning ceremonies are usually provided by the funeral home. Most providers have some in stock meant to be loaned out during ceremonies and services. However, some bereaved choose to purchase a crown specifically for their lost loved one.

Some of the most common types of funeral crowns include:

  • Wooden Crowns – Wooden funeral crowns are natural yet powerful. They can symbolize a connection to the earth as well as wisdom, strength of spirit, and other qualities of the deceased. As wooden funeral crowns are less common, it may be difficult to find one to purchase and therefore it might be best to make your own.
  • Flower Crowns – Flower crowns and hand-woven head wreathes are great for crowning ceremonies as they are beautiful, natural, and have a long-standing tradition in memorializing the dead. In ancient European societies, unmarried women who died were given flower crowns to symbolize and bless their new lives as brides of Christ.
  • Costume Crowns – Costume crowns and tiaras, like those found in Halloween shops or accessory stores, are flashy and bright, making them ideal for use in funeral crowning ceremonies. If you choose a costume crown for a crowning, look for ones with lots of rhinestones for a lustrous, eye-catching effect.
  • DIY Crowns – People who are deeply affected by the death of a loved one may find comfort in the act of making a funeral crown for the deceased. DIY crowns can also be made to perfectly suit the deceased and what made them unique, serving as a symbol of their individualism, achievements, or another aspect of their lives. If you choose to make the funeral crown, be sure you communicate it with your provider and bring it to them well in advance of the ceremony.

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Do you want to learn more about funeral crowns or Newtown, PA funeral homes? We are happy to do whatever we can to help. Call or visit us today to learn more about what we can do for you in your time loss or of preplanning.